September 6, 2014   1 note
September 4, 2014   2 notes
The day I almost died of a heat stroke and @rickyhattaway had to cut my jeans into shorts and pour ice water on my to stay coherent. @liverpoolandwidnes

The day I almost died of a heat stroke and @rickyhattaway had to cut my jeans into shorts and pour ice water on my to stay coherent. @liverpoolandwidnes

September 4, 2014   1 note
#TBT The Cadets

#TBT The Cadets

September 4, 2014   1 note
#TBT The cadets, 98ish? Me with blonde hair. @peterbc

#TBT The cadets, 98ish? Me with blonde hair. @peterbc

September 3, 2014
September 3, 2014   1 note
September 3, 2014
September 3, 2014
September 2, 2014   2 notes
September 2, 2014   128 notes
alfiusdebux:

Lill Tschudi Linocut, 1930.
The painter and printmaker Lill Tschudi was born in Switzerland in 1911. Impressed by the work of Norbertine Bresslern-Roth, she studied linocut (which was to remain her favorite medium) at the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London, then went to Paris to study with Gino Severini and Fernand Léger. Inspired by technology, speed and modern life, she completed some sixty linocuts in the 1930s dealing mainly with sport, work and the London Underground. In the postwar years, she turned towards abstract art, telling her mentor Claude Flight that the war had destroyed her ability to depict humanity in an optimistic light. In 1986, she was awarded the Swiss national print prize for her life’s work. She died in 2004.

alfiusdebux:

Lill Tschudi Linocut, 1930.

The painter and printmaker Lill Tschudi was born in Switzerland in 1911. Impressed by the work of Norbertine Bresslern-Roth, she studied linocut (which was to remain her favorite medium) at the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London, then went to Paris to study with Gino Severini and Fernand Léger. Inspired by technology, speed and modern life, she completed some sixty linocuts in the 1930s dealing mainly with sport, work and the London Underground. In the postwar years, she turned towards abstract art, telling her mentor Claude Flight that the war had destroyed her ability to depict humanity in an optimistic light. In 1986, she was awarded the Swiss national print prize for her life’s work. She died in 2004.

(Source: mheu.org, via aleatoryalarmalligator)